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  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Shippy

    What was the fabled british "Long Tom"?

    A 150 MM Arti piece, I believe.


    How many shots were fired to sink HMS Hood?

    What was the Ships name who sunk the Hood? and what country did she come from?
    Andrew Bruce
    Naval Electronic Sensor Operator 00115
    HMCS Vancouver FFH-331

  2. #42
    Gungod is on a distinguished road Gungod's Avatar
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    I'll go with 1 shot, BISMARK, and Germany..

    Why the term 'Jolly Tars'...
    LCdr Martin Packer
    102 frase2sub
    GFLSFCM~HMWCSG
    A.F & A.M

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Gungod
    I'll go with 1 shot, BISMARK, and Germany..
    Bang on (no pun intended)
    Yes with one shot to the Magazine, the Bismark sunk HMS Hood. (pride of the Royal Navy eh?)

    People have always wanted nice hair, so the sailors to keep them in good spirits they would be given tar to put in their hair, to keep it from getting caught in stuff, so they were Jolly tars.
    Andrew Bruce
    Naval Electronic Sensor Operator 00115
    HMCS Vancouver FFH-331

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefGunny
    Bang on (no pun intended)
    Yes with one shot to the Magazine, the Bismark sunk HMS Hood. (pride of the Royal Navy eh?)

    People have always wanted nice hair, so the sailors to keep them in good spirits they would be given tar to put in their hair, to keep it from getting caught in stuff, so they were Jolly tars.
    Actually, she took a couple of hits from the Bismark just prior to the fatal hit to the magazine.
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

  5. #45
    Actually, a monkey's fist was originally used in Asia. When they made the knot, they made it so that there was a small hole in the center. The stuck it in the neck of a clear bottle, so that it wouldn't come loose. They then put chunks of fruit in it, where the monkey's would stick their hands in it, and get stuck. This is what I heard from an officer a couple of years ago, but he was pretty serious about it.
    "Sailing is more than just a sport, it becomes your life"

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by kat2566
    Actually, a monkey's fist was originally used in Asia. When they made the knot, they made it so that there was a small hole in the center. The stuck it in the neck of a clear bottle, so that it wouldn't come loose. They then put chunks of fruit in it, where the monkey's would stick their hands in it, and get stuck.
    And the point of that would be to?...

    What was the first submarine to sink an enemy vessel? Name both the submarine and the target.
    Tim Woyma
    ENS USN
    USS ANZIO
    "Stand and Fight!"

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by TWoyma
    And the point of that would be to?...

    What was the first submarine to sink an enemy vessel? Name both the submarine and the target.
    The CSS Hunley sank the USS Housatonic.

  8. #48
    Maybe I should stop asking such easy questions
    Tim Woyma
    ENS USN
    USS ANZIO
    "Stand and Fight!"

  9. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by TWoyma
    Maybe I should stop asking such easy questions
    Google + Wikipedia defeats all.

  10. #50

  11. #51
    Cheaters never win, and winners never cheat

    Quote Originally Posted by Fearless
    Who can tell me what a corvus was used for and by whom?
    Since nobody answered, I will. If I'm remembering my naval history class, the corvus was Rome's secret weapon at sea. Basically a bridge, it would be dropped from a Roman galley onto an enemy vessel alongside. A large spike on the end of the corvus would pierce the enemy deck and hold the ships together. Roman soliders could then cross the corvus and take the enemy vessel. This exploited the superiority of the Roman legionare in hand-to-hand combat.
    Tim Woyma
    ENS USN
    USS ANZIO
    "Stand and Fight!"

  12. #52
    Were did Jolly Tars come from? like what does it mean?
    Andrew Bruce
    Naval Electronic Sensor Operator 00115
    HMCS Vancouver FFH-331

  13. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefGunny
    Were did Jolly Tars come from? like what does it mean?
    Jolly Tars are men, (or crew) on old square rigged ships. They originated in Britain.

    What's the expression, "between the devil and the deep blue sea" mean?
    Last edited by Thompson; 24th March 2005 at 14:33. Reason: made a mistake
    "Sailing is more than just a sport, it becomes your life"

  14. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by kat2566
    Jolly Tars are men, (or crew) on old square rigged ships. They originated in Britain.

    What's the expression, "between the devil and the deep blue sea" mean?
    The deepest guts of the ships's hold had to be regularly maintained and usually tarred. The deckhead, owing to the fact it was so low, was the source of much bumped heads and was often cursed... becoming "the devil" in the process. A sailor given this miserable chore was sandwiched between the "devil and the deep blue sea."

    Here's one for our American friends (TWoyma, I'm looking at you since you got corvus right [it means raven or crow, by the way])

    Who was Lewis "Chesty" Puller?

    Bonus points if you can accurately quote one of his memorable sayings.
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

  15. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Fearless
    The deepest guts of the ships's hold had to be regularly maintained and usually tarred. The deckhead, owing to the fact it was so low, was the source of much bumped heads and was often cursed... becoming "the devil" in the process. A sailor given this miserable chore was sandwiched between the "devil and the deep blue sea."
    I understood the devil to be the widest seam in the hull, hence the expression about having the devil to pay and only half a bucket of pitch.

  16. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by SLt McKay
    I understood the devil to be the widest seam in the hull, hence the expression about having the devil to pay and only half a bucket of pitch.
    That's a distinct possibility, the definition Ireceived was in fairly ambiguous terms.
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

  17. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by Fearless
    Who was Lewis "Chesty" Puller?

    Bonus points if you can accurately quote one of his memorable sayings.

    Lieutenant General Lewis Burwell "Chesty" Puller, USMC is famous for being the most decorated Marine in history. Over the course of his Marine career (spanning from his original enlistment in 1918 to his medical retirement in 1955) he earned an unprecedented five Navy Crosses (the 2nd highest award for valour for a USN/USMC member) as well as a number of other awards, many for valour.

    Many US Marines traditionally end their day with the declaration, "Good night Chesty, wherever you are!"


    Some 'famous' quotes of Puller's:

    "All right, they're on our left, they're on our right, they're in front of us, they're behind us...they can't get away this time."

    "We're surrounded...That simplifies our problems."


    Q: What system of classification was used for the Royal Navy's Rated ships in the 19th Century?
    Capt JMA (Jamie) McKay

  18. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Fearless
    The deepest guts of the ships's hold had to be regularly maintained and usually tarred. The deckhead, owing to the fact it was so low, was the source of much bumped heads and was often cursed... becoming "the devil" in the process. A sailor given this miserable chore was sandwiched between the "devil and the deep blue sea."
    Another meaning, that I've heard, for "between the devil and the deep blue sea," is
    The Devil= The keel
    The deep blue sea= The bottom of the ocean

    Thus, when someone used this expression, the meaning for it: nothing. There is nothing between the devil and the deep blue sea.
    "Sailing is more than just a sport, it becomes your life"

  19. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by JMcKay
    Q: What system of classification was used for the Royal Navy's Rated ships in the 19th Century?
    The Royal Navy classified their ships as first rate, second rate, third rate etc, ships. First rate was the best.

    Q: What is the date that England commemorates 'Trafalger day?' You have to give month, date and year. bonus points if you can give Englands war hero for this particular war.
    "Sailing is more than just a sport, it becomes your life"

  20. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by kat2566
    The Royal Navy classified their ships as first rate, second rate, third rate etc, ships. First rate was the best.

    Q: What is the date that England commemorates 'Trafalger day?' You have to give month, date and year. bonus points if you can give Englands war hero for this particular war.
    First rates were not necessarily the best. They carried the most guns and men, but were massive, ponderous and very expensive. At the time of Trafalgar, the Royal Navy had close to a hundred first rates on hand, but only thirty or so were active at any time.

    In reality, the third rates (exemplified by French-built 72s) were probably the best ships in the line. They were fast, maneuverable and well armed and carried such attributes in more or less perfect balance. If you look at the Royal Navy, or indeed any navy from this period that was building capital ships, you will find that most of them are the third rates.

    Trafalgar Day is the 21st of October, commemorating the Battle of Trafalgar (21st October, 1805). It honours England's greatest son, Horatio Nelson.

    Who knows what epoch making ship was launched in 1906?
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

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