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  1. #21
    HMS Warrior I believe.

    What was the original use of the knot, the Monkey's Fist? (where did it get it's name?)
    "Sailing is more than just a sport, it becomes your life"

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Bos'n101
    Nelson was the Lord High Admiral of the Royal Navy, during the Napoleonic war. I'll assume you are referring to the victory over the French at the Battle of Trafalgar, although that is hardly all he was famous for!

    What was the name of the first ironclad warship. (debatable answer)
    Actually Nelson was only a Vice-Admiral of the White. I'll bet he's referring to the Battle of Copenhagen when he was ordered by his superior by signal flags to withdraw and according to legend held up a telescope to his blind eye and claimed that he really did not see the signal.

    HMS WARRIOR
    Gene C. Fedderly, CD, RCN
    Lieutenant-Commander

    qgjmcd2

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by SLt McKay
    Especially Useless Trivia: I lived in Oakville Block in Victoria for two months last year -- there's a picture of the ship's company on the lobby.

    How do you know LCdr Copeland?
    He is a member of the local Legion, and has visited the corps several times. He also works at the Rememberance Day services each year, so I make a point of talking to him.
    Hutch

  4. #24
    HMS Warrior I believe.

    What was the first use of the Monkey's Fist. How did the name come to be?
    "Sailing is more than just a sport, it becomes your life"

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by SLt McKay
    Except that brass doesn't expand when it gets cold; it shrinks. (Very, very few materials expand when they get cold.) It's nice story, though!

    Snopes provides: http://www.snopes.com/language/stories/brass.htm
    Thanks for beating me to the punch. I debunk that one whenever I hear it.
    Gene C. Fedderly, CD, RCN
    Lieutenant-Commander

    qgjmcd2

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Lt(N) Gene Fedderly
    Actually Nelson was only a Vice-Admiral of the White. I'll bet he's referring to the Battle of Copenhagen when he was ordered by his superior by signal flags to withdraw and according to legend held up a telescope to his blind eye and claimed that he really did not see the signal.

    HMS WARRIOR
    Ah yes, I stand corrected!
    Hutch

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Bos'n101
    Nelson was the Lord High Admiral of the Royal Navy, during the Napoleonic war. I'll assume you are referring to the victory over the French at the Battle of Trafalgar, although that is hardly all he was famous for!

    What was the name of the first ironclad warship. (debatable answer)
    First to see battle? USS Monitor and CSS Merrimack at Hampton Roads.

    First all-steel contruction? HMS Warrior

    The first Ironclads were French wooden hulled warships covered in iron plates for closes bombardment work. They were used in the 1853-56 Crimean War, esp. at Sevastopol. However, owing to their great weight, they were not capable of moving under their own power.

    Explain the following:
    Chainshot, roundshot, hotshot, grapeshot and cannister.

    Double points if you can handle double shot.
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

  8. #28
    Ok, I think I know this one...
    All types of amunition for cannons. Chain=2 balls chained together, round=cannon ball, hot, I believe would be explosive cannon balls, grape would be many small peices, designed to take of the crew(like a shotgun). Not sure about cannister or double, no question because I left it incomplete.
    Hutch

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Bos'n101
    Ok, I think I know this one...
    All types of amunition for cannons. Chain=2 balls chained together, round=cannon ball, hot, I believe would be explosive cannon balls, grape would be many small peices, designed to take of the crew(like a shotgun). Not sure about cannister or double, no question because I left it incomplete.
    Chain, you're correct. Hot, wrong. Grapeshot is correct, although it is worth noting that it was usually composed of musket balls (incidentally, the schrapnel used in the Great War was essentially the same .75 cal. musket balls used by the British Army since the mid 1700s.
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

  10. #30
    Does anyone know how the Monkey's fist came to be? Like how it got it's name, and what it was originally used for?
    "Sailing is more than just a sport, it becomes your life"

  11. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Fearless
    Explain the following:
    Chainshot, roundshot, hotshot, grapeshot and cannister.

    Double points if you can handle double shot.
    Chainshot = 2 balls chained together, used mainly to target rigging
    Roundshot = standard cannonball, used to make holes below the waterline
    Hotshot = Heated canonball, used to start fires aboard the target vessel
    Grapeshot = Bag of Musketballs, used to kill crew, and do little damage to the ship
    Cannister = Similar to grapeshot but contained in a cannister, again used to kill the crew
    Double = Twice the powder? (thats a stab)

    What was the fabled british "Long Tom"?
    CPO1 Shane Stephenson (Ret)
    Retired Coxswain of RCSCC 178 Oakville
    I reject your reality and substitute my own!
    The empires of the future are the empires of the mind. - Sir Winston Churchill

    canada poland england scotland

  12. #32
    Long Tom cannons were used by the Boers during the Anglo-Boer War from 1899 - 1902. These cannon were drawn from one battlefield field to the next by a span of oxen. This proved a slow, tedious task resulting in British cavalry outrunning the transportation of the guns by the Boers. To ensure that Long Tom never fell into British hands the Boers destroyed each gun, late in the war, when they could no longer outmaneuver the swiftly approaching British forces.
    "Sailing is more than just a sport, it becomes your life"

  13. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Shippy
    Chainshot = 2 balls chained together, used mainly to target rigging
    Roundshot = standard cannonball, used to make holes below the waterline
    Hotshot = Heated canonball, used to start fires aboard the target vessel
    Grapeshot = Bag of Musketballs, used to kill crew, and do little damage to the ship
    Cannister = Similar to grapeshot but contained in a cannister, again used to kill the crew
    Double = Twice the powder? (thats a stab)

    What was the fabled british "Long Tom"?
    Double shot is basically loading twice as many projectiles than normal in a cannon. The British were very fond of doing this. For example: the Victory at Trafalgar passed across the stern of a French warship (Bucentaure unless I'm mistaken) and poured two and a half broadsides double shotted into her. The resulting storm of splinters, roundshot and dismounted guns killed or injured around 670 men out of an 800 man crew in less that three minutes.

    The downside is that the range of a gun loaded as such is severely limited.

    Who can explain the significance of the Battle of Lepanto?
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

  14. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by kat2566
    Does anyone know how the Monkey's fist came to be? Like how it got it's name, and what it was originally used for?
    Monkey fists were used at weight on the end of heaving lines. They were used to pass lines from ship to pier, or ship to ship. Sadly, they've been replaced (at least in the USN) by blaze orange rubber balls and shot rifles.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fearless
    Who can explain the significance of the Battle of Lepanto?
    Defeat here lost control of the Mediterranean for the Ottoman Empire, and halted their expansion into Europe. It was also the last major naval engagment fought primarily with galleys.


    Here's an easy one: To this day, only one SSN has sunk an enemy vessel. Name both the submarine, and the ship she sank.
    Tim Woyma
    ENS USN
    USS ANZIO
    "Stand and Fight!"

  15. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by TWoyma
    Monkey fists were used at weight on the end of heaving lines. They were used to pass lines from ship to pier, or ship to ship. Sadly, they've been replaced (at least in the USN) by blaze orange rubber balls and shot rifles.


    Defeat here lost control of the Mediterranean for the Ottoman Empire, and halted their expansion into Europe. It was also the last major naval engagment fought primarily with galleys.


    Here's an easy one: To this day, only one SSN has sunk an enemy vessel. Name both the submarine, and the ship she sank.
    HMS Conqueror sank the General Belgrano during the Falklands War.

    EDIT: This was the only sinking in anger, but as I recall there have been several collisons over the years resulting in sinking as well.
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

  16. #36
    How about this? Who can tell me what a corvus was used for and by whom?
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

  17. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Fearless
    Who can tell me what a corvus was used for and by whom?
    Oh, oh, oh, I know! But I'll be quiet and let someone else have some fun
    Tim Woyma
    ENS USN
    USS ANZIO
    "Stand and Fight!"

  18. #38
    engineer is on a distinguished road engineer's Avatar
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    I think one of the first really modern warships was HMS Warrior. I think it was the first to have propulsion other that sail. When traveling she would be under sail and when an enemy ship appeared she would fight under power. The prop could also be raised and lowered to reduce drag.
    CI Horwood
    rcscc quinte
    Boatswain TG II Div O HMCS Ontario

  19. #39
    The steam-powered coastal defense vessel Demologos was built for the USN in 1813. (http://college.hmco.com/history/read...ltonsteamf.htm)
    Tim Woyma
    ENS USN
    USS ANZIO
    "Stand and Fight!"

  20. #40
    Take a close look at the monkey's fist. It does actually look like the clenched fist of a small primate.
    Martin Hartley
    Trainee Officer - Australian Air League, Padstow Squadron
    Former Leading Seaman, Australian Navy Cadets

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