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  1. #1

    Ongoing Naval Trivia

    Right, now that we've all warmed up with the Dolphin Code (you guys were brilliant...too funny). Let's try this again.

    If you answer a question, it becomes your turn to ask a question. Lets see if we can't all teach each other a thing or two.

    I'll start us off.

    Where did the phrase "Freeze the balls off a brass monkey" originate"?


    Sylena Urbanoski
    Every person is in some way, my superior.- Emerson


  2. #2
    haha, I was actually talking with my barber back home about this! Hilarious!

    On ships, the pieces of brass that held the cannonballs in place by the cannons for loading purposes were called "the brass monkeys." When it got very cold, the brass would expand, and the cannonballs wouldn't stay fast in their holdings, and fall out. Thus, "freeze the balls of the brass monkey."

    Where did the naval term of using the "head" come from?
    Last edited by Juice; 22nd March 2005 at 21:50.
    Run until you can't. Then run some more

  3. #3
    In the days on the old sailing vessels, the men would go hang off the bow(or head) of the ship. Eventually, an actual toilet was installed at this location, though it was little more than a seat with a hole in it!
    So, if the men said, "Going to the head!" everyone knew they had to use the facilities. Hence to name stuck.
    What was the last ship to be sunken by the HMCS Sackville? Where, when, and why did this happen?
    Hutch

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Juice
    Where did the naval term of using the "head" come from?
    The term comes from the days of sailing ships when the place for the crew to relieve themselves was all the way forward on either side of the bowsprit, the integral part of the hull to which the figurehead was fastened.

    On 21 May 1982, 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines, made an opposed landing on what South Atlantic islands?

  5. #5
    Gonna say the Falklands.
    YES! The Falkland Islands, in order to recapture the Islands from Argentina. This particular action was against San Carlos.
    Last edited by Bos'n101; 22nd March 2005 at 22:49.
    Hutch

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Bos'n101
    Gonna say the Falklands.
    YES! The Falkland Islands, in order to recapture the Islands from Argentina. This particular action was against San Carlos.
    Bad Chief, no cookie.

    Sylena Urbanoski
    Every person is in some way, my superior.- Emerson


  7. #7
    What?!? Is this because I didn't add a question? if so, see my anwer to the question before it. Man, I wanted that cookie, too!
    Hutch

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Bos'n101
    What was the last ship to be sunken by the HMCS Sackville? Where, when, and why did this happen?
    I can't name her, but she was a pleasure vessel secured nearby. SACKVILLE's lines failed during Hurricane Juan and she was repeatedly blown into the other vessel, sending her to the bottom of Halifax Harbour.

  9. #9
    And where's your question sir?
    Run until you can't. Then run some more

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Juice
    haha, I was actually talking with my barber back home about this! Hilarious!

    On ships, the pieces of brass that held the cannonballs in place by the cannons for loading purposes were called "the brass monkeys." When it got very cold, the brass would expand, and the cannonballs wouldn't stay fast in their holdings, and fall out. Thus, "freeze the balls of the brass monkey."
    Except that brass doesn't expand when it gets cold; it shrinks. (Very, very few materials expand when they get cold.) It's nice story, though!

    Snopes provides: http://www.snopes.com/language/stories/brass.htm

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Juice
    And where's your question sir?
    Oops.

    Okay, an easy one: why was the naval reserve called the Wavy Navy?

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by SLt McKay
    Oops.

    Okay, an easy one: why was the naval reserve called the Wavy Navy?
    Traditionally, officers in the Naval Reserves bars were actually wavy. This tradition continues on British Reserve Officers, I believe (if nothing else, it's on their cadet officers).

    What class was the HMCS Oakville, and what is the story of how she sank a U-boat?

    CH
    Lt(N) Hoult
    Ottawa ON

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by SLt McKay
    I can't name her, but she was a pleasure vessel secured nearby. SACKVILLE's lines failed during Hurricane Juan and she was repeatedly blown into the other vessel, sending her to the bottom of Halifax Harbour.
    Good enough. The tall ship Larenda(I think thats the spelling).
    Hutch

  14. #14
    The Oakville was a Flower Class Corvette, and she rammed it! (I hear this story every year from LCdr(RCN) George Copeland)

    Ok, easy one... How many guns did the HMS Victory have?
    Hutch

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Chief Hoult
    Traditionally, officers in the Naval Reserves bars were actually wavy. This tradition continues on British Reserve Officers, I believe (if nothing else, it's on their cadet officers).

    What class was the HMCS Oakville, and what is the story of how she sank a U-boat?

    CH
    HMCS OAKVILLE was a Flower class corvette. It sank the U-94 by ramming it.

    Who can tell me what a handspike and a wormscrew are used for?
    "...they will not run away from the sea if they realize that the Navy is a challenge, not a chesterfield."

    -The Mainguy Report

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Chief Hoult
    Traditionally, officers in the Naval Reserves bars were actually wavy. This tradition continues on British Reserve Officers, I believe (if nothing else, it's on their cadet officers).

    What class was the HMCS Oakville, and what is the story of how she sank a U-boat?

    CH
    Type: Corvette
    Class: FLOWER Class 1939-1940
    Displacement: 950 tonnes
    Length: 205.1 ft.
    Width: 33.1 ft.
    Draught: 11.5 ft.
    Top Speed: 16
    # Officers: 6
    # Crew: 79
    Weapons: 1-4" Gun, 1-2 pdr, 2-20mm, Hedgehog
    Pendant (Hull Number): K178
    Builder: Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Port Arthur, Ont.
    Laid Down: 21-Dec-40
    Commissioned: 18-Nov-41

    Launched: 21-Jun-41

    and


    On Wednesday November 5th, 1941 Oakville and district residents thronged to Lakeside Park to join in and cheer at dedication ceremonies for the corvette H.M.C.S. Oakville. Residents, semi-military, military and civilian units paraded through the streets. Mrs. F.M. Deans, wife of Mayor M. Deans, dedicated the corvette. Rev. Canon D. Russell Smith blessed the vessel. All community and civic organizations were represented in the guards of honor.

    The “Oakville” went off to World War II and on August 28th, 1942 sunk a German U-boat, U-94, one of only three corvettes to do so during the war. A Men of Valor poster commemorates this historic event.

    One June 11th, 1989 Lieutenant Governor Lincoln Alexander unveiled a stone cairn in Tannery Park dedicated to the Officers and Crew who served in H.M.C.S. Oakville.

    On Saturday November 6th, 1999 #178 RCSCC Oakville was formally commissioned. This Sea Cadet Corps has the honor of holding the same pendant number as H.M.C.S. Oakville - K178. The Badge the Sea Cadets wear on their tunics is reminiscent of the original town crest and the gun shield created for H.M.C.S. Oakville.

    On Sunday May 28th, 2000 RCSCC Oakville held its 1st Annual Inspection and celebrated another victory.

    Just thought I would add this. No new question as others posted first.
    Last edited by Lt(N) Bryan McIntyre; 23rd March 2005 at 08:11.
    Bryan McIntyre CD
    Lt(N)
    RCSCC OAKVILLE canada
    cd

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Bos'n101
    The Oakville was a Flower Class Corvette, and she rammed it! (I hear this story every year from LCdr(RCN) George Copeland)

    Ok, easy one... How many guns did the HMS Victory have?
    HMS Victory had 100 guns.

    I can't think of a question right now, so I will just carry on Fearless' question.

    What are a handspike and a wormscrew used for?
    Run until you can't. Then run some more

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Bos'n101
    The Oakville was a Flower Class Corvette, and she rammed it! (I hear this story every year from LCdr(RCN) George Copeland)
    Especially Useless Trivia: I lived in Oakville Block in Victoria for two months last year -- there's a picture of the ship's company on the lobby.

    How do you know LCdr Copeland?

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Juice
    HMS Victory had 100 guns.

    I can't think of a question right now, so I will just carry on Fearless' question.

    What are a handspike and a wormscrew used for?
    A handspike is a heavy wooden bar used for shaping object of ordnace, or a crowbar or lever.

    A wormscrew is a double spiral hook, used to remove debris from the bore.

    What was Lord Nelson famous for, (hint, during one of his great victories).
    "Sailing is more than just a sport, it becomes your life"

  20. #20
    Nelson was the Lord High Admiral of the Royal Navy, during the Napoleonic war. I'll assume you are referring to the victory over the French at the Battle of Trafalgar, although that is hardly all he was famous for!

    What was the name of the first ironclad warship. (debatable answer)
    Hutch

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