+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1

    Question Why do we do drill?

    Remember when you were a Level One and hated doing drill? Every year when new recruits show up, the thing they complain the most about is drill. Why? I believe it is simply because they do not see the point of doing it.

    "Why do we do drill?" Asks little Timmy.

    "How come we can't just chill on the parade square?" James inquires.

    "It is soooooo pointless!" Shouts Jenny.

    So this year, I decided to plan a lesson specifically to explain why we do drill. I am thinking of telling the cadets the origin of drill, and how it evolved during the years. Also I am going to show the a video of a drill team in action (because learning attention-ease is boring, they should know what advanced drill is like). Could you guys give me some suggestions on how I could teach this class?

  2. #2
    Make it fun, our instructor made it so fun and interesting when i first learned drill. i cant understand how you can hate drill, all the lvl 1s and lvl 2s around me and heck even some lvl 3s hate it.

    dont make it too too long and exhausting thats why i might avoid the dc and dcic courses.

    if i get a chance to speak with some senior cadets this monday or thursday i might snag a few more tips for ya!
    For most the sky is the limit, For those who love aviation, the sky is home

    "We're paratroopers, lieutenant. We're supposed to be surrounded." (BoB)

  3. #3
    I have always liked the front matter in the CF Drill Manual (A-PD-201-000/PT-000):

    AIM

    2. The aim of drill and ceremonial is to
    contribute to the operational effectiveness of the CF
    by:

    a. ensuring that the CF efficiently march and
    manoeuvre together as one in duty and
    routine; and

    b. promoting discipline, alertness, precision,
    pride, steadiness and the cohesion
    necessary for success.

    3. Drill is the basis of all teamwork.

    It also has a good sections on the origin and some good information a few para's later in under the section titled "GENERAL".

    Good luck with your presentation.

    MedicalGuy.
    gcs2ssmcpsmnatofyqdjmcd1osjsm

  4. The Following 2 Users Like This Post By MedicalGuy :


  5. #4
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...udy-finds.html

    By Press Association5:38PM BST 26 Aug 2014

    Marching can have the psychological effect of making soldiers more fearless, a study has shown.

    Volunteers were less physically intimidated by a threatening ''criminal'' when they paired up and walked in step, psychologists found.
    After marching side-by-side, they rated the owner of an angry face mugshot less formidable in terms of his estimated size and strength.
    From a squaddie's perspective, it means there might be a point to all that square-bashing after all.

    Well-disciplined soldiers who regularly drill may both operate more efficiently as a cohesive unit and be less likely to flinch in the face of danger, the study suggests.

    But there might also be a ''dark side'' to the military benefits of marching, warn the scientists, led by Dr Daniel Fessler from the University of California at Los Angeles.
    They point out that as well as reducing fear, synchronised behaviour - in a variety of situations - is likely to increase aggressiveness to a perceived foe.
    Writing in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters, the researchers conclude: ''Given the ubiquity of institutionalised synchronisation in contexts as diverse as athletic competitions and police formations, this disturbing possibility merits investigation.''

    Synchronised behaviour in both humans and animals has previously been shown to encourage co-operation between individuals, especially during conflict.
    The new research went further by exploring how alliances born from synchronised behaviour might affect the way people respond to a dangerous adversary.
    Participants in the study were asked to walk a distance of 244 metres with a ''confederate'' before being shown a cropped ''mugshot'' of an angry male face.
    Volunteers were randomly assigned either to ''march'' in sync with their partners, or to walk at their own pace.
    After studying the mugshot, they had to assess the owner's likely height, size and muscularity.

    The results were combined to produce a ''formidability'' rating which turned out to be lower after participants had been marching together.
    ''Men who walked synchronously with another man envisioned a purported criminal as less physically imposing than did men who engaged in the same task without synchronisation,'' the researchers wrote.

    ''Thus, synchrony diminished the perceived relative fighting capacity of the foe.''
    Although synchronised behaviour increased social bonding, it appeared to have a separate impact on fearlessness, the study found.
    The scientists added that, since in conflict situations individuals are more likely to attack a foe viewed as weak, it followed that ''the experience of synchrony may also up-regulate the motivation to aggress''.

  6. The Following User Likes This Post By eliminator :


  7. #5
    When I was a divisional officer for new entry cadets, I discussed that exact question before the first drill class. I talked about teamwork and presenting a good image for the unit in public, but also the value of drill in a ship (they were sea cadets). Operating a ship is similar to drill: the officer of the watch gives a specific command (e.g., "half ahead both engines") and it requires a specific, exact, response. Firefighting is the same thing: the attack team leader says "on water, cool the hatch", and there's exactly one correct action in response. You may be able to find examples in the air force environment that you could use to demonstrate that drill is about more than just parades.

  8. The Following 5 Users Like This Post By N. McKay :


  9. #6
    I lucked out, and the cadet who asked me that was a fan of the Total War game series, so I was able to use that as an example.

    Teamwork, and unit cohesion. What works better? A bunch of gaggle units running across a field hap-hazard, or a well-drilled formation working together for maximum impact?

    Battlefield formations don't exist in the same way anymore, but the underlying principle is the same. Crisp, rapid, coordinated and well trained response to commands get the job done. Parade drill is an expression of that in ceremonial form.
    2Lt McInnes, Admin O
    2834 RCACC (Artillery)
    Yorkton, SK, Canada

  10. #7

    The origins of drill and ceremonial

    The famous English author Rudyard Kipling in his essay, “The Magic Square” theorizes that the elements of military drill including keeping step, the line, the wheel and forming ranks and files were first discovered in the very dawn of human consciousness. Kipling wrote that modern drill and ceremonial has its origins in the hunting tactics devised by early man to drive game into the open. In order to survive in a harsh world the hunters of the community learned to work together in an organized and disciplined fashion.

    At one time, military drill and tactics were the same, much of the former being movements needed on the field of battle. Such drills have existed since ancient times. The Romans are reputed to have used cadence marching for tactical formations. General military ceremonial drill developed early in the 20th century as changing conditions divorced tactics from barrack routine and ceremonial.

    The foot and arms drill of the services were derived from tactical practices to move troops in an orderly and efficient manner and form the basis of the precise maneuvers used in military displays and ceremonies today.

    There is no doubt that among the world’s military, the foundation of discipline is based on parade drill. The leadership epigram, “You have to learn to take orders before you can give them” has been proven time and time again. Good drill, well rehearsed and demanding the highest precision, is an exercise in personal leadership, self-discipline, and alertness.

    The hallmarks of drill in the Canadian Cadet Organization are efficiency, precision and dignity. These qualities are developed through self-discipline and practice. They lead to unit pride and cohesion. Units which display constant competence in drill, are recognized universally as highly trained, well disciplined, professional, and well led. Drill sets the standard for the execution of any duty, both in the individual and in the group. Drill that is well taught and executed results in a sense of confidence that is essential to morale and esprit-de corps and is the basis of all teamwork.
    GWP
    osjqgjm
    qdjmcd1osjsm

    mvac

  11. #8
    x_paden_x is on a distinguished road x_paden_x's Avatar
    Join Date
    2014
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    88
    Gender
    Blog Entries
    3
    Now, This is one thing that bothers me. because I'm one of those kids, Who enjoys drill, And strives to do it right, and correct.


    Drill is one of the Scarce Military parts left in our cadet program.

    I was given a Speech about drill once by our Flight Commander at camp, And it was a really good speech. It went on about, How Drill was traditionally used to Hide Numbers, To strike fear into your enemies, And plenty more Interesting things about drill.

    And boy, Did our flights drill pick up... Like a lot.


    Now, What I noticed, Is, We weren't taught about why drill is important. I know it sounds like a boring class, And to some it might be, But there is plenty of worse classes. *I personally don't enjoy sitting through Classes on Government too often, Because it's in ways, Irrelevant*

    I think if New cadets, Were given the Compassion and Desire to do drill (Through means or lessons or Inspiration or something) New cadets wouldn't hear all of this "Oh, You'll get used to it" And would be A boost to them.


    I applaud what you're doing, because When I was a level one, I never had a class about the purpose of drill. (We had kids drop because they didn't like the drill...)

    I wish you and your Squadron the best of luck with Educating and Motivating your new Level ones this year.
    "Sometimes, you just gotta take all the mayo packets you find from the mess hall..." -A cadet I overheard on course, who at the time, was in fact putting mayo packets into his pocket.

  12. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by x_paden_x View Post
    Now, This is one thing that bothers me. because I'm one of those kids, Who enjoys drill, And strives to do it right, and correct.


    Drill is one of the Scarce Military parts left in our cadet program.

    I was given a Speech about drill once by our Flight Commander at camp, And it was a really good speech. It went on about, How Drill was traditionally used to Hide Numbers, To strike fear into your enemies, And plenty more Interesting things about drill.

    And boy, Did our flights drill pick up... Like a lot.


    Now, What I noticed, Is, We weren't taught about why drill is important. I know it sounds like a boring class, And to some it might be, But there is plenty of worse classes. *I personally don't enjoy sitting through Classes on Government too often, Because it's in ways, Irrelevant*

    I think if New cadets, Were given the Compassion and Desire to do drill (Through means or lessons or Inspiration or something) New cadets wouldn't hear all of this "Oh, You'll get used to it" And would be A boost to them.


    I applaud what you're doing, because When I was a level one, I never had a class about the purpose of drill. (We had kids drop because they didn't like the drill...)

    I wish you and your Squadron the best of luck with Educating and Motivating your new Level ones this year.


    i feel ya, thank god we had a CI come in. if not everyone except me would have dropped out. it would be nice if people actually cared. on GT everyone stepped on my boots in flight because they didn't want to stay in step at all. ruined my poor beutiful boots. and to add insult to injury we got yelled at by captains, leftenents and majors because only a few tried to do drill to there best abilities.

    one day i got to march with DCICs and boy i was happy to be in a flight that actually knew how to do drill and wanted to.
    For most the sky is the limit, For those who love aviation, the sky is home

    "We're paratroopers, lieutenant. We're supposed to be surrounded." (BoB)

  13. #10
    x_paden_x is on a distinguished road x_paden_x's Avatar
    Join Date
    2014
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    88
    Gender
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by mikemomajr View Post
    i feel ya, thank god we had a CI come in. if not everyone except me would have dropped out. it would be nice if people actually cared. on GT everyone stepped on my boots in flight because they didn't want to stay in step at all. ruined my poor beutiful boots. and to add insult to injury we got yelled at by captains, leftenents and majors because only a few tried to do drill to there best abilities.

    one day i got to march with DCICs and boy i was happy to be in a flight that actually knew how to do drill and wanted to.

    At GT, Our flight was doing drill everyday, And it didn't help people kept Faking Injuries and Sickness just to get out of drill...

    Which Prolonged drill class for the 5 of us who could last on the Parade square for more then Five minutes.

    And then the five of us got an Impromtu Class from the DCI's, Man, they were helpful.
    "Sometimes, you just gotta take all the mayo packets you find from the mess hall..." -A cadet I overheard on course, who at the time, was in fact putting mayo packets into his pocket.

  14. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by x_paden_x View Post
    And it didn't help people kept Faking Injuries and Sickness just to get out of drill...
    Do me a favour, don't make accusations about things are are pure hearsay. Talk like that doesn't go down well with many - including me.
    gliderwingsJ-P Johnson cd1
    Barrie Ontario
    The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.

  15. #12
    x_paden_x is on a distinguished road x_paden_x's Avatar
    Join Date
    2014
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    88
    Gender
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by J-P Johnson View Post
    Do me a favour, don't make accusations about things are are pure hearsay. Talk like that doesn't go down well with many - including me.
    My apologies sir. That wasn't my Intention.
    "Sometimes, you just gotta take all the mayo packets you find from the mess hall..." -A cadet I overheard on course, who at the time, was in fact putting mayo packets into his pocket.

  16. #13
    CW Staff Writer Thundah is on a distinguished road Thundah's Avatar
    Join Date
    2013
    Location
    Peterborough ON
    Posts
    305
    Gender
    Blog Entries
    19
    I think you (the FSgt or whoever is interested) should perhaps find a video of cadets with particularly good drill, a compilation to show cadets the fruits of their labours, I always found that watching good drill inspired me to do good drill and made me think of why we do drill. Be sure to tell the cadets about why drill is done, it's history and perhaps let some people give examples of drill movements. Give the cadets your own opinion on drill and perhaps how it makes you feel (proud, focused, etc).
    L. Korolenchuk
    Flight Sergeant (Ret'd)

    aircsmlsm | canada

  17. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by x_paden_x View Post
    My apologies sir. That wasn't my Intention.
    this is unrelated but i cannot send or recive your private messages..
    For most the sky is the limit, For those who love aviation, the sky is home

    "We're paratroopers, lieutenant. We're supposed to be surrounded." (BoB)

  18. The Following User Likes This Post By mikemomajr :


  19. #15
    lmckeown is on a distinguished road lmckeown's Avatar
    Join Date
    2010
    Location
    Montreal, QC
    Posts
    206
    Gender
    Blog Entries
    1
    I attended Aviation Day last year at St-Hubert Airport near Montreal. there were Hundreds ( id even stretch to maybe just under 1200 ) cadets and officers attending from dozens of Squadrons.

    Commander, RCAF was the RO for the parade.. and personally, I feel that Drill is something that every Squadron who attended needs to take more seriously. Some of it wasn't pretty, and honestly it just comes down to practice and proper instruction, in my opinion, anyways.
    gliderwingsaircsm1powerwings
    CI L. McKeown
    Chief Instructor | Scholarship Ground School Instructor
    Escadron 518 Rosemont, RCACs

    "Be the change that you wish to see in the world" ~ Mahatma Gandhi

  20. #16
    One of my observations about drill over the past 26 years has been that it is an excellent training tool for ensuring the prompt, automatic and correct response to a command being called out. Think about the 100's of times that you have been ordered to attention... automatically your body reacts to the word of command. Without thinking about it you execute a picture perfect motion.

    Although useful for a number of reasons, the assurance of a prompt, automatic and correct response to a command being called is very useful in high-stress and emergency situations. I have two to share.

    The first one is when I was a Private. Someone in the chain of command reckoned that it would be a good idea to Aussie rappel (forward facing) from the helicopter skid of the rappel tower. This activity retrospectively was conducted without the required amount of ground training and rehearsal of concept drills, no doubt adding to my stress when I was at the top of the tower and the "next man" to hook up and get out on the skid. I remember clearly to this day the Rappel Master, a Master Corporal from 2 Commando, looking at me and saying, "you have fear in your eyes son", followed by some unkind words of encouragement. When he hooked me up he looked at me and said, "Private you will follow my words of command. Do you understand?" Which I yelled, "Yes Master Corporal" without even thinking. When I got out on the skid I was a bit of a mess. Sweating, shaking and thinking to myself that there was no way in hell I was going to jump face first off the skid and soar towards the ground. The next commands he gave me were very simple and ones that I had experienced a 100 times before. He ordered me in his drill voice to, "Steady up" and then jacked me up for not standing straight enough, and shaking. Once I controlled myself to his liking he yelled the order, "Go Go Go" and I did without hesitation or analysis of the command in question. Next thing I know I am on the ground and executing the "off rappel drill". It was just like I was on the parade square. As an aside, despite being very comfortable repelling in the conventional never, I never have gotten used to the whole Aussie repel thing.

    The second time is when I was in Bosnia as a Captain. While running a medical clinic I had the occasion to come in contact with a very intoxicated local gentleman who wanted to kill me with a pitch fork. Despite a number of techniques to defuse the situation I failed. The situation evolved to the man being in front of me, my two NCO's behind me with rifles shouldered, magazines in, and a patient I was treating behind them. I gave the command, in my best drill voice, "Ready" and without hesitation I heard both rifles cock, the forward assist struck, go on safe and even the ejection ports close. It was almost synchronized with parade ground precision as if we had rehearsed it a fifty times (although we did not). That action defused the situation and the man left (thank God) without further escalation. I knew, subconsciously, when I called out the command, without question that my order was going to be followed by these two Corporals. The fact that they executed the command so quickly and in a synchronized manner only added to the effect and reaffirmed to me that time on the parade square doing drill is not wasted.

    Sometimes you need to carry out a prompt, automatic and correct response to a command being called out and sometimes you need to be able to give a command and know it will be carried out without question, quickly and automatically. This is especially true in emergency and high-stress situations.

    Those are my experiences. Mileage may vary. There are many other good reasons to do drill (such as moving a formed body from one place to another and ceremony), but I reckoned I would share some of my thoughts.

    MedicalGuy
    gcs2ssmcpsmnatofyqdjmcd1osjsm

  21. The Following 11 Users Like This Post By MedicalGuy :


Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts