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  1. #1

    Air I just got accepted for the Glider Pilot Scholarship at RGS Prairie, any advice?

    I have worked so long and finally got the scholarship. Cant wait to finally start flying, does anyone have any advice for this course?

  2. #2

    Air

    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan6585 View Post
    I have worked so long and finally got the scholarship. Cant wait to finally start flying, does anyone have any advice for this course?
    Well I did GPS this past summer, and I have one BIG piece of advice:

    Get Sleep, and study for your flights

    At ERGS, if you fail either four flights or four exams, you're sent home. There are 49 flights on course, and 7 written exams. That means there's a much higher chance of being sent home by failing flights than there by failing exams (by the way, the pass mark for the written exams is 70%, which isn't astronomically difficult to attain). No one from my year got sent home for failing exams, but a bunch of people got sent home for failing flights. When instructors say to get sleep at night, they really mean it.

    On a more entertaining note, it was heavily encouraged at ERGS that when you are writing exams, you should always "RTFQ2." You can urban-dictionary that acronym if you need a little more insight...

    Anyways, best of luck on glider! Have fun!
    WO1 Bradley Martire
    211 Kiwanis RCACS
    rclcme
    aircsmlsmafac
    Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

  3. #3
    jamiesonaelick is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan6585 View Post
    I have worked so long and finally got the scholarship. Cant wait to finally start flying, does anyone have any advice for this course?
    It sounds stupid,but practice your emergency procedures and checks while sitting in bed. Memorizing movements helps when you're stressed.
    BTW RGS was the best
    FSGT Jamieson Aelick
    734 Squadron Alliston Legion


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  5. #4
    You should be getting a precourse package in the mail shortly. At a minimum, you should go over all the information once to be familiar with it(e.g. circuit heights, aerodrome info) and MEMORIZE the speeds/dimensions/x-wind limitation table as they will be likely be tested on the first week.

    Like others mentioned before, it would be helpful to practice your checks/emergency procedures in bed/off duty. As well, you should practice flying the entire flight(from pretakeoff checks to landing) in your head so you are familiar with the flow.

    Although there will be a lot of work(from studying, to flying, to pushing gliders after someone landed longgg on a first solo), its important to have fun and enjoy the company of the wonderful people(both instructors and cadets) you will be meeting.


    *Note* This is from my experience at CRGS, regional differences might vary.
    Basic 2k8 ITLC 2k9 AATC-AO 2k10 AATC 2k11

  6. #5
    Well, I don't have any advice (seeing as I'll be going to the course at the same time as you! ) but congratulations on getting GPS! If I had been on a month ago, I probably would have suggested going to your local gliding center to get practice doing timesheets/.etc and being comfortable on the airfield. I'll see you in Gimli!

  7. #6
    If you learn well by reading, get a copy of the Transport Canada AIM. It will teach you all you need to know (and much, much more) for the written exams (ie. air law, meteorology, etc.). I just asked the instructors on course and someone had a copy that I studied from, especially for the TC exam closer to the end of course. Or you can get a PDF copy here: https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviati...-menu-3092.htm.

    You will have all the information you need in the supplied copy (I hope they still do that) of the From the Ground Up. The AIM is just if you like to go above and beyond. I'll admit I spent a few of weather days sitting in my room alone and reading(skimming) through the AIM.
    powerwings Kenneth Froese aircsm lsm
    Former WOII, 12 RCACS Edmonton
    Military Band: Advanced Musician - PACSTC 2011 anavets
    GPS - RGS (Pra) 2012 afac| PPS - Penhold 2013 afac

  8. #7
    Having enough sleep is crucial whenever you are undergoing flight training. Good decision making is essential when flying, and that's one of the first thing that goes when you are sleep-deprived.
    OCdt Brian Wong
    Chief Ground School Instructor, Administration Officer
    150 Hamilton Tiger Squadron

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by TowersL View Post
    Well, I don't have any advice (seeing as I'll be going to the course at the same time as you! ) but congratulations on getting GPS! If I had been on a month ago, I probably would have suggested going to your local gliding center to get practice doing timesheets/.etc and being comfortable on the airfield. I'll see you in Gimli!
    Yeah thanks! I went and staffed at my local gliding center for a whole season and now I've completely memorized my checks and emergency procedures, soo happy i did that! See you in Gimli!

  10. #9
    Congrats! I did glider back in 2011😰 but it was the best summer in cadets ever. Even better than power because everyone works together and power you're really all by yourself. Stay hydrated and first day there memorize all the speeds to get that out of the way. Also, make sure you're always running for gliders...never slack behind. Plus wing is the first job to pick up and one of the easiest so its worth it. When you get to stalls,spins and spiral dives... Make sure to eat but eat light and always healthy so that if your stomach doesn't cooperate u can still fly on aha...enjoy glider and the rest of your cadet career. There's none like any other!
    Glider Wings
    rclcmeaircsm
    WO2 699 JP
    Basic 07' ITAC 09' AATC-AO 10' Glider 11'
    " Never Settle "

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by GenX View Post
    Having enough sleep is crucial whenever you are undergoing flight training. Good decision making is essential when flying, and that's one of the first thing that goes when you are sleep-deprived.
    Excellent post. Fatigue and flying do not mix. There is a great analogy about flight training and the huge amount of information that you are expected to absorb in a relatively short time: "like drinking from a fire hose". Get your rest and be prepared for each flight. Things happen fast up there and you can't slow the aircraft down to match your mindset. You must be ahead of the aircraft at all times.
    Cheers!

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