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  1. #21
    Seaman Parkinson-Dow is on a distinguished road Seaman Parkinson-Dow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-P Johnson View Post
    Care to elaborate?
    I think he meant discontinued.
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  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Seaman Parkinson-Dow View Post
    I think he meant discontinued.
    I'm going to assume that he meant that as well.

    An aviation occurrence like this is certainly not going to seriously affect the future of the Air Cadet Gliding Program. While our glider operations are extremely safe, sometimes crashes happen. This is an unfortunate reality of operating any kind of vehicle. Nevertheless, tens of thousands of flights each year with very few serious accidents is impressive.

    I'm glad that no one was hurt. We'll just have to wait until the Directorate of Flight Safety issues their report to know what happened.

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  4. #23
    Lt Ferreira is on a distinguished road Lt Ferreira's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woods View Post
    I'm glad that no one was hurt. We'll just have to wait until the Directorate of Flight Safety issues their report to know what happened.
    To add a piece of dry humor:

    The plane ran out of air.
    Capt Drew Ferreira
    Commanding Officer
    258 "Little Giant" RCACS - Chetwynd, BC


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  6. #24
    To add to my previous post about accidents happening, here are the numbers of accidents that occurred with ACGP aircraft in each of the past 3 years:

    2012: 2 (one of which included two gliders)
    2011: 2
    2010: 2

    While this might seem like a lot, it is important to keep in mind that this while flying tens of thousands of flights each year, so crashes are very rare.

    Source: DFS

  7. #25
    Lt Ferreira is on a distinguished road Lt Ferreira's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woods View Post
    To add to my previous post about accidents happening, here are the numbers of accidents that occurred with ACGP aircraft in each of the past 3 years:

    2012: 2 (one of which included two gliders)
    2011: 2
    2010: 2

    While this might seem like a lot, it is important to keep in mind that this while flying tens of thousands of flights each year, so crashes are very rare.

    Source: DFS
    In order to be on that list what has to occur? Bodily injury. Because we created numerous flight safety reports at RGS Pacific this summer. Including some that sent instructors to their rooms for some healing..
    Capt Drew Ferreira
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  8. #26
    Bravo-One is on a distinguished road Bravo-One's Avatar
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    For those interested, the CADORS report has been uploaded online. http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Saf-Sec-Sur/...um%3d2013P1451

  9. #27
    Travis Buckle is a glorious beacon of light Travis Buckle is a glorious beacon of light Travis Buckle is a glorious beacon of light Travis Buckle is a glorious beacon of light Travis Buckle is a glorious beacon of light Travis Buckle is a glorious beacon of light Travis Buckle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2Lt Ferreira View Post
    In order to be on that list what has to occur? Bodily injury. Because we created numerous flight safety reports at RGS Pacific this summer. Including some that sent instructors to their rooms for some healing..
    This list appears to only show 'accidents' which are very few and far between.

    My understanding of an 'accident' in the aviation industry is any event where there is either injury to the pilot or serious damage to an aircraft. (Ex. The event discussed in this thread)

    What you're thinking of is most likely an 'incident' which has a different meaning, and is how we report anything which could have become an accident. This could be anything from a cadet running in front of a tow plane to a vehicle driving across the landing area while a glider is on final approach.

    Incidents do happen sometimes and these reporting methods which you are speaking of is how we view how we can better avoid the same issue from happening again.
    Captain Travis Buckle canada

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  11. #28
    To solidify what Travis had to say ... here it is from the horses mouth.

    AIM GEN 3.2
    aviation occurrence” means
    (a) any accident or incident associated with the operation of
    an aircraft; and
    (b) any situation or condition that the board has reasonable
    grounds to believe could, if left unattended, induce an
    accident or incident described in paragraph (a).
    ....
    reportable aviation accident” means an accident resulting
    directly from the operation of an aircraft, where
    (a) a person sustains a serious injury or is killed as a result of
    (i) being on board the aircraft,
    (ii) coming into contact with any part of the aircraft or
    its contents, or
    (iii) being directly exposed to the jet blast or rotor
    downwash of the aircraft;
    (b) the aircraft sustains damage or failure that adversely
    affects the structural strength, performance or flight
    characteristics of the aircraft and that requires major
    repair or replacement of any affected component part; or
    (c) the aircraft is missing or inaccessible.

    reportable aviation incident” means an incident resulting
    directly from the operation of an airplane having a maximum
    certificated take-off weight greater than 5 700 kg, or from the
    operation of a rotorcraft having a maximum certificated takeoff weight greater than 2 250 kg, where
    (a) an engine fails or is shut down as a precautionary measure;
    (b) a transmission gearbox malfunction occurs;
    (c) smoke or fire occurs;
    (d) difficulties in controlling the aircraft are encountered
    owing to any aircraft system malfunction, weather
    phenomena, wake turbulence, uncontrolled vibrations or
    operations outside the flight envelope;
    (e) the aircraft fails to remain within the intended landing or
    take-off area, lands with all or part of the landing gear
    retracted or drags a wing tip, an engine pod or any other
    part of the aircraft;
    (f) any crew member whose duties are directly related to the
    safe operation of the aircraft is unable to perform the crew
    member’s duties as a result of a physical incapacitation
    that poses a threat to the safety of any person, property or
    the environment;
    (g) depressurization occurs that necessitates an emergency
    descent;
    (h) a fuel shortage occurs that necessitates a diversion or
    requires approach and landing priority at the destination
    of the aircraft;
    (i) the aircraft is refuelled with the incorrect type of fuel or
    contaminated fuel;
    (j) a collision, a risk of collision or a loss of separation occurs;
    (k) a crew member declares an emergency or indicates any
    degree of emergency that requires priority handling by an
    air traffic control unit or the standing by of emergency
    response services;
    (l) a slung load is released unintentionally or as a precautionary
    or emergency measure from the aircraft; or
    (m) any dangerous goods are released in or from the aircraft.
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  12. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by oke a View Post
    to solidify what travis had to say ... Here it is from the horses mouth.
    Note that DFS has a different system for classifying flight safety occurrences:

    A-GA-135-001/AA-001
    Flight Safety for the Canadian Forces
    7-3

    FS Accident
    11. An event in which one or more of the following occured:
    A. A person is missing or receives fatal, very serious or serious injuries or illness (black,
    red or yellow) as determined by a medical officer in accordance with cfao 24-1. The
    aircraft, its equipment or its operation must have contributed to the event for it to be
    classed as an air accident; or
    b. A cf aircraft is destroyed, missing or sustains very serious or serious damage.

    FS Incident
    12. An event in which one or more of the following must occured:
    A. Someone receives minor injuries (green or nil) as determined by a medical officer in
    accordance with cfao 24-1, or there is risk of injury;
    b. A cf aircraft sustains minor damage; or
    c. There is no injury or damage but accident potential did exist;

    Edit: We're starting to get a little off topic, aren't we?

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