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Thread: Corps Title

  1. #21
    Forde.089 is on a distinguished road Forde.089's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-P Johnson View Post

    Two steal a line from Churchill: two countries separated by a common language.
    to*

    You're quoting George Bernard Shaw, not Churchill.

    The quote was also used by George C. Scott, playing General George S. Patton Jr. in the movie Patton (1970)
    JUSTIN S. FORDE
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  2. #22
    CWiki Contributor of the Year - 2009 ctjj.stevenson is on a distinguished road ctjj.stevenson's Avatar
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    Actually, one thing that has been bugging me locally is when people her in Eastern uses ''NCSM Qc'' instead of writting ''NCSM QUEBEC'' which is the abvriation of Her Majesty's Canadian Ship QUEBEC. I have seen this many times over the years, and I saw it again when Bagotville CSTC sent out the invitation for the first reunion of former members of both HMCS QUEBEC and Bagotville. HMCS/NCSM QUEBEC is already proper shortening of the ship's name, and some people feel it has to be shorten more.
    Last edited by ctjj.stevenson; 7th July 2013 at 09:09.

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  4. #23
    Freestyle is on a distinguished road Freestyle's Avatar
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    I concur with that: "HMCS QUEBEC" need not be shortened. What's the abbreviation for Charlottetown or Ottawa; both being HMCS names as well. Would it be alright to say: "HMCS TO" or "HMCS T-Dot"?

  5. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Freestyle View Post
    I concur with that: "HMCS QUEBEC" need not be shortened. What's the abbreviation for Charlottetown or Ottawa; both being HMCS names as well. Would it be alright to say: "HMCS TO" or "HMCS T-Dot"?
    Ship names are shortened to three letters, generally the first three. For your examples above the abbreviations are CHA, OTT, and TOR.

    There are two-letter abbreviations as well, which I've only ever seen painted on the flight decks of ships so-equipped: CH, OA, and TO. (There's an official list in what used to be called MARCORDs.)

  6. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by N. McKay View Post
    Ship names are shortened to three letters, generally the first three. For your examples above the abbreviations are CHA, OTT, and TOR.

    There are two-letter abbreviations as well, which I've only ever seen painted on the flight decks of ships so-equipped: CH, OA, and TO. (There's an official list in what used to be called MARCORDs.)
    As a former UK tactical communicator, I've seen three (and sometimes four) letter abbreviations for ship's names only in tactical scenarios, briefings, OPORDERS, etc., not general correspondence/documentation. The only place I've ever seen the two-letter abbreviation is on a flight-deck.

    If people want another international reference showing how another navy uses capitalisation for ships' names, the UK's JSP101 is available on the web - the short version is that names are capitalised.

  7. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by aashworth View Post
    As a former UK tactical communicator, I've seen three (and sometimes four) letter abbreviations for ship's names only in tactical scenarios, briefings, OPORDERS, etc., not general correspondence/documentation.
    The three-letter versions get a certain amount of informal day-to-day use, at least, in the RCN.

  8. #27
    Although this thread hasn't been active for awhile, I was just reading it and thought I would add a few points:

    1) The reason we capitalize ship's names in military writing is because standard typewriters don't have italics. Many of the conventions we use in all writing actually originate with printers (the ones who wore ink-stained aprons, not the ones connected to your computers). The indenting of parapraphs, punctuation, line spacing, etc were all developed and standardized by printers. They were the ones who started the practice of italicizing ship's names in order to make them stand out in the text and perhaps to ensure that the ship's name was not confused with it's eponymous word. Trust me, folks still get confused with our current batch of ship's named after cities. Back to the point, back in the day when we all used typewriters for correspondence and because typewriters can't automatically italicize letters, the Navy started the practice of capitalizing names for the same reason that printers italicized them. Traditional perhaps, but really just a practical solution to a problem.

    2) Including corps numbers in the name (e.g. 130 RCSCC FREDERICTON) would be the same as saying, "283 HMCS ALGONQUIN." We don't do that. In fact, the only time we even really discuss the side numbers is when we're talking about pranking another ship by re-painting theirs.

    3) Two and three letter abbreviations for ships' names are used quite often, but never in any proper form or correspondence. As one person pointed out, we always use the two-letter ones on flight decks (usually, but not always, the first and last letters of the name - leads to problems with PROTECTEUR, PRESERVER AND PROVIDER - PT, PS AND PR). Two-letter abbreviations were also useful in the days of grease pencil tracking on the radar screen.

  9. #28
    Forde.089 is on a distinguished road Forde.089's Avatar
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    When many cadet corps march past they use the hull number in the command, for example, "Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Number 31 LION will march past in..."

    Announcing your hull number for a march past does seem pointless since there can only be one R.C.S.C.C. SWIFTSURE or H.M.C.S. RAINBOW at a time.

    Neither cap tallies from Local Cadet Units or those from Her Majesties Ships or Her Majesties Canadian Ships have the hull number printed on them, whereas sometimes the baseball caps do.

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    JUSTIN S. FORDE
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    "Life brings its own education, and the life of the sea permits no truancy. It says to a man, 'learn to be a seaman, or die.'"

  10. #29
    The NATO ship class designator hull number have more to do with filling up space and ballancing the appearance of the front of the ball cap than anything else. Ball caps for units that have no hull number, have no number. Naval Reserve Division ball caps put the home city name on the bottom line.

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