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Thread: Ask a Brit!

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by NatoBro View Post
    Very true. When I was in France in 2008 and on a battlefield tour, our tour guide mentioned to my friend and I that he has had folks from Quebec in his groups in the past, and couldn't understand a word they said.
    Had the same problem in Nice, my girlfriend at the time was from Montreal and thought she could survive with her Quebecoise language (learned in Westmount I might add). The cabbie just stared right through her when she gave directions on where we wanted to go. She then spoke in English and he understood perfectly especially the part about only having U.S. Dollars.
    Captain J. Gleiberman cd1
    Everytime I think I am out, they keep pulling me back in.
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    Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mich stärker.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Gleiberman View Post
    Had the same problem in Nice, my girlfriend at the time was from Montreal and thought she could survive with her Quebecoise language (learned in Westmount I might add).
    Happen to me also when I was visiting Belgium and France. I can think of at least two occasion where the guide told us, they could provide a German guided tour. Once in Normandy when visiting the D-Day museum, we pointed to the guide that we where Canadian and that we came to visit where Canadian soldier landed to free them from the German (and at the same time I pointed out that the Canadian flag was upside down but that's an other story), the other time was when visiting the Citadel of Dinant.

  3. #63
    Alexthecadet is on a distinguished road Alexthecadet's Avatar
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    I'm curious about about how you Brits get to go on wargames and run around and shoot each other and all that jazz. In Australia, when it comes to fieldcraft, camoflage; tracking; and setting up harbours and pickets is about as far as it goes. We don't learn any tactics or anything like that.

    What sort of stuff do you guys get up to when you go bush? Do you dig trenches? What kinds of tactics do you guys learn? What's Marine Cadets like?

    I'm actually really surprised no one has asked all this yet, because as far as I know, Canadians don't get to do that stuff either; just the Brits and Americans. I'd love to be a Marine Cadet and go out bush with you guys and do wargames and stuff.
    Former Cadet Sergeant A. Cladera
    223 Squadron, Australian Air Force Cadets

  4. #64
    The Royal Marine Cadet's are an attachment to the UK Sea Cadet Corps, they adopt many of the traditions of the Royal Marines, and do alot of field training. I'm sure somebody who's operated with the RMC more than I will be able to fill in more details!
    J. Sylvester,
    Former Petty Officer (UK Sea Cadet Corps).

    JOIN THE WEB CADET CORPS - An online Cadet adventure!

  5. #65
    Alexthecadet is on a distinguished road Alexthecadet's Avatar
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    So you're a normal Sea Cadet, not a Marine Cadet?

    Yes, I know they're attached, just as the Royal Marine Corps is attached to the Royal Navy.

    Thanks for replying I've been hanging out for a while
    Former Cadet Sergeant A. Cladera
    223 Squadron, Australian Air Force Cadets

  6. #66
    Aye, I was a Petty Officer Cadet in the UK Sea Cadets, currently in-limbo for the transition to become an Adult member of staff.
    J. Sylvester,
    Former Petty Officer (UK Sea Cadet Corps).

    JOIN THE WEB CADET CORPS - An online Cadet adventure!

  7. #67
    Alexthecadet is on a distinguished road Alexthecadet's Avatar
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    Ahh ok.

    That said, do the regular Sea Cadets do wargames and stuff like that?

    Good luck becoming a staff member, I'm sure it'd be quite rewarding.
    Former Cadet Sergeant A. Cladera
    223 Squadron, Australian Air Force Cadets

  8. #68
    Its very rare that sea cadets and marine cadets go out into the field together, because some of the RMC syllabus is restricted just for RMC's. However, in the UKSCC, we do offer Expedition Leadership courses and Expedition Training, where you learn how to hike and navigate and map read and make tents and eat ration packs and all good stuff like that!
    J. Sylvester,
    Former Petty Officer (UK Sea Cadet Corps).

    JOIN THE WEB CADET CORPS - An online Cadet adventure!

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  10. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Sexton View Post
    My question for you guys,
    I was on an exchange to the UK last summer, and I met a bunch of amazing people my first week there.
    It was while I was at Okehampton with a bunch of marine cadets.
    While I was there, I forgot to get anyones last name, and now I don't have contact with them
    Anyways, my question,
    would someone from the UK be able to PM me or get in touch with me and I can show you guys a couple pictures to find out if you know them ?
    I had some cadets there last year.
    CPO C Devonport
    CO, Barnsley Sea Cadets

  11. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by josh sylvester View Post
    Its very rare that sea cadets and marine cadets go out into the field together, because some of the RMC syllabus is restricted just for RMC's. However, in the UKSCC, we do offer Expedition Leadership courses and Expedition Training, where you learn how to hike and navigate and map read and make tents and eat ration packs and all good stuff like that!
    It does happen though, we have had Blue Jackets attend Green Jacket camps and do field training etc.
    CPO C Devonport
    CO, Barnsley Sea Cadets

  12. #71
    To be fair I think that the amount of RMC training that bluejackets do, all depends on the Unit.
    My original Sea Cadet unit, we did a lot of combined fieldcraft training and the Sea Cadets got to do exactly the same as the MC's.
    However in some Sea Cadet units the two are kept completely separate and the blue side see no fieldcraft at all.

    Also, do remember that not all Sea Cadet units have Marine Cadet detachments.

  13. #72
    admin_god is on a distinguished road admin_god's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amok View Post
    By the way, just out of curiosity, are all the British Cadets using the L98A2 now, or was it just the Army Cadets (CCF)?

    Also, you guys have the funniest ways of marching. Your arms extend over your head for some corps and you march at a MUCH faster tempo... it's quite a sight!!! LOL

    arms at 90 degress to the body at full reach and 120 30 inches paces a minute (guards marching pace most people march at about 108-116 paces a minute but i like to look good!)

  14. #73
    admin_god is on a distinguished road admin_god's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alexthecadet View Post
    Anyway, I've got stuff to ask a Brit.

    I'm really, really curious about and really, really jealous of how you Brits get to go on wargames and run around and shoot each other and all that jazz. I'm from Australia where our cadet system is really soft . When it comes to fieldcraft, camoflage, tracking, and setting up harbours and pickets is about as far as it goes . We don't learn any tactics or anything like that (we aren't even allowed to play paint skirmish or laser skirmish) .

    What sort of stuff do you guys get up to when you go bush? Do you dig trenches? Is it really super-ultra fun running around with modified SA80s shooting each other up? What kinds of tactics do you guys learn? What's Marine Cadets like?

    I'm actually really surprised no one has asked all this yet, because as far as I know, Canadians don't get to do that stuff either; just the Brits and Americans. Only just kidding, I'd kill to be a Marine Cadet and go out bush with you guys and do wargames and stuff.
    normally when we go Exercise (going into the bush as you put it) we tend to practice low level tactics, so nothing more than anything involving about 30 people (about a platoons worth).
    we are now starting to use the L98A2 cadet rifle, very similar to the SA80 but no automatic fire selector, we use blank rounds and when we can get hold of them smoke grenades and thunderflashes, and at night flares (both rocket and trip type)
    depending on level of knowledge of the cadets we go up to practicing platoon attacks as well as ambushes.
    we always practice cam and concealment.
    different units tend to slighty different things but always wortking towards the cadet syllabus, i am not to sure about the ATC and SCC but fieldcraft is a main part of the teaching for the ACF and the CCF(Army)
    Occasionally the Regs come out with us and we get use LSW's and very rarely the GPMG

  15. #74
    Alexthecadet is on a distinguished road Alexthecadet's Avatar
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    Thanks, Sir,

    Here in Australia, we do cam and concealment on all our bivouacs. How often do you guys go on exercise? No more than a platoon? Is that a platoon on each side, or in total? As I'm sure you noticed, I'm extremely jealous. If we did that, it would be quite epic, seeing as how our squadron is huge, and the staff try and get everyone to go on every activity, and our sister-squadron is also huge.

    That'd be pretty cool, going out with the real soldiers. Do the British soldiers like the CCF, or do they think you guys are annoying? Over here, some love us, some think we're stupid.

    30 inch paces is the same as us, though we only bring our arms to breast-pocket height. I think we march at 116 paces per minute also, though don't take my word for it...

    Smoke grenades and thunderflashes? Wow, I'm surprised civillians would be allowed to use those. CCF members are civillians, aren't they?
    Former Cadet Sergeant A. Cladera
    223 Squadron, Australian Air Force Cadets

  16. #75
    admin_god is on a distinguished road admin_god's Avatar
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    A platoon sized unit at most is used as 'friendly forces' and a few other cadets are used as 'enemy forces'. we try to follow the rule that you don't take on anything that you are less that three times the size of. though this often just individual unit exercises, on summer camps etc. we do bigger things, but there are no all out war it's all strictly controlled by the Staff.
    It's the same here with the Regs, though generally they don't mind us.
    A lot of the Cacet staff are Ex-service so have all the qualifictaion's to use pyro, in my unit we have two ex-regs, a WO2 and a Capt. in the CCF a lot of the staff are teachers from the school, but in the othere cadet services the staff come from all walks of life.
    In the CCF all staff are officers as they deamed to professionally qualified and therefore get a commission the other Cadet services the staff are usually NCO's and start off as a Sergeant intructors.

    with the marching the arm comes out to the front to the level of the shoulder. Most cadest don't march at 120 paces a minute i only make my cadest do it if they have annoyed me or an officer!

  17. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by J. Gleiberman View Post
    Louisiana and New Orleans in particular have two accents Cajun and Creole. Cajun is a corruption of the Quebec accent, and can be as thick as molasses in some cases. Personally to me a Cajun accent sounds like someone from New York who took a Grade 10 French class at A.Y. Jackson Collegiate in North York, and then got hit in the mouth with a bag of marbles. Creole is startlingly similar to a French accent, but with a Caribbean twist, quite similar to the Haitian accent, but that is to be expected since Haitians and Creoles share the same heritage.
    To be a little more precise, the Cajun accent is a derivative of the accent of the French population of the Maritimes... the Acadians. "Cajun" itself is an adaptation of "Acadian" that came about after the deportation of more than 14 000 Acadians from the Maritimes by British officials between 1755 and 1763 (often referred to as the Great Expulsion or Great Upheaval). A number of them made their way down to Louisiana and, as they mixed themselves into the culture there, became Cajun.
    Capt JMA (Jamie) McKay

  18. #77
    g.landonbrowne is on a distinguished road
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    I was born bred and raised in Englan, then moved to Canada at 11! It is a totally different lifestyle here compared to back "home"...

  19. #78
    Reed is on a distinguished road Reed's Avatar
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    Hey all. I'm around at this exact moment, so any questions about recent times or generally ANYTHING, ask away.
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  20. #79
    I'm also here for an adult perspective...
    Petty Officer(SCC) James COPELAND
    Warsash Sea Cadets | UK Sea Cadet Corps
    Assistant Area Staff Officer (Communication & Information Systems) (Southern Area)

    British Forum Moderator | Adult Staff


  21. #80
    ..And I'm also here if you wan't a females perspective...
    APO (SCC) G L Johnson
    Unit Training Officer
    Huddersfield Sea Cadets
    United Kingdom

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